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Diabetes (HbA1c) Test Service

$35

Check your average blood sugar levels over the last 2-3 months. Help manage your diabetes or see if you may be developing type 2 diabetes.

Fingerprick sample collection kit

Secured online results account

Customised results sharing

Pre-paid sample return

Laboratory analysis

Track your levels over time

Free shipping

WHAT'S INCLUDED

Fingerprick sample collection kit

Secured online results account

Customised results sharing

Pre-paid sample return

Laboratory analysis

Track your levels over time

Free shipping

Why should I take this test?

Check for diabetes

Many cases of type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed when detected early. Know your risk so you can act.

Manage diabetes

If you have diabetes you know that keeping your HbA1c in the target range recommended by your doctor will reduce the risk of serious diabetes complications.

Note: This HbA1c test is not to be used in the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and is not recommended for the diagnosis of gestational (pregnancy) diabetes, or if you have certain other health conditions. Please consult your doctor.
  • CHECK FOR DIABETES

  • $35ea

  • SUBSCRIBE & SAVE 15% - min. 2 tests

  • Learn more

    $29ea

$35ea

Why should I take this test?

Check for diabetes

Many cases of type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed when detected early. Know your risk so you can act.

Manage diabetes

If you have diabetes you know that keeping your HbA1c in the target range recommended by your doctor will reduce the risk of serious diabetes complications.

Note: This HbA1c test is not to be used in the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and is not recommended for the diagnosis of gestational (pregnancy) diabetes, or if you have certain other health conditions. Please consult your doctor.

The HbA1c diabetes test checks your average blood glucose levels over the last 2-3 months and reports on whether you may have diabetes, or may be developing type 2 diabetes, or whether diabetes is unlikely for you at this time.

This test can also be used to help with long term management of diabetes. If you are living with diabetes this is another way you can take the HbA1c test that your doctor recommends every 3 to 6 months to make sure that your average blood sugar is staying in the healthy range.

Our blood test service is one small way to make your life easier. There’s no need to squeeze a visit to the pathology collection centre into your day and no needles to worry about. We only need a couple spots of blood provided on a specialised collection card. Our dried blood spot test for HbA1c levels has been found to be comparable to testing with traditional whole blood samples.

If your HbA1c level is raised your healthcare provider can use this information to help guide you to the next steps to best manage your health.

How It Works

Simply order your tests online (or buy in store) and take a fingerprick sample of blood at home, at a time that suits you.

Return your samples to us by post, and our quality controlled, accredited laboratory will process your results.

Your results will be delivered via our secure website in a matter of days and you can share with your doctor or others as you wish.

The HbA1c (or glycated haemoglobin) test measures your average blood sugar levels over the previous 2 to 3 months.

You can use this test to:

  • Check if you may be developing diabetes (pre-diabetes)
  • Identify if you may have type 2 diabetes
  • Check that your health is on track and that diabetes is not likely at this stage
  • Manage your existing diabetes

If you have diabetes, you will be familiar with the HbA1c test that your doctor arranges every few months to help you manage and monitor your condition. The HbA1c test may be used regularly to monitor your diabetes control, particularly if you have had a recent change in medication.

Keeping your HbA1c level within the target range recommended by your doctor will lower your risk of serious diabetes complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and lower limb amputation.

Note: This HbA1c test is not to be used in the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and is not recommended for the diagnosis of gestational (pregnancy) diabetes, or if you have certain other health conditions. Please consult your doctor.

The HbA1c test is used to diagnose and manage diabetes. It is not suitable for everyone. HbA1c tests should not be used as an indicator of diabetes for:

  • Children and young adults
  • Pregnant women or women who have been pregnant in the past 2 months
  • People with possible type 1 diabetes
  • People who have only had symptoms of diabetes for a short period
  • People at high risk of diabetes who are acutely ill
  • People taking drugs that may cause a rapid rise in blood sugar (blood glucose), such as corticosteroids or antipsychotic drugs (for less than 2 months)
  • People with damage to the pancreas or who have had surgery of the pancreas
  • People with kidney failure

If there’s a possibility you have a condition that affects your red blood cells or haemoglobin, you should consult with your doctor before taking an HbA1c test.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about a test service.

HbA1c measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2-3 months, so it's important to check your levels regularly. This helps in the early detection of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, by letting you know if your blood sugar levels are creeping up beyond the healthy range.

And, there's a really easy way to keep track of your average blood sugar levels over time using our subscription service.

Perhaps you need to check your blood sugar level every 3 months? Or maybe you'd like to check your risk once a year? Our subscription service makes it easy – simply tell us how often you want to take your test and we'll take care of the rest. We'll send you your new collection kit when it's time to do your next check, and it's affordable too – you only pay for each test service when it's time to send you a new kit.

So, do you know how your blood sugar levels are tracking?

Early detection could be your key to reversing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. And Diabetes NSW & ACT now recommend regular testing for everyone over the age of 40.

If you subscribe to regular tests, you'll save more than 15% OFF the single test service price. A minimum purchase of two test services is required to take advantage of the subscription savings. Conditions apply, please read our frequently asked questions and Terms and Conditions.

You can track your HbA1c levels over time, because each time you take the test, your results will be recorded and shown in tables and a graph, a little bit like viewing your phone or electricity bill. You will be able to see at a glance how your HbA1c levels are changing over time, making it easier for you to monitor and manage your health. You can set up to automatically share your results with your doctor or whoever you choose, or you can easily print out your results to take to your doctor if you prefer.

Facts:
1 person every 5min

develop diabetes every day.

Approx. 1.2 million

Australians have officially been diagnosed with diabetes.

Approx. 2.45 million

Australians have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

More than 100,000

Australians have developed diabetes in the past year.

Develop diabetes every day.
Australians have officially been diagnosed with diabetes.
Australians have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Australians have developed diabetes in the past year.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to process blood glucose (blood sugar) effectively. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to several debilitating conditions including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and lower limb amputations. There are four main types of diabetes:

  • Pre-diabetes – Where blood glucose levels are higher than the healthy range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes people with pre-diabetes may go on to develop type 2 diabetes. For more info
  • Type 1 – This is an autoimmune condition. There is no cure and it cannot be prevented. Onset of type 1 diabetes occurs abruptly with obvious symptoms. If you suspect you may have type 1 diabetes seek urgent medical attention. For more info
  • Type 2 – This is a progressive condition developing over a period of years. Some risks of developing type 2 diabetes are unavoidable such as family history and ethnic background, but lifestyle choices play a big part. For more info
  • Gestational diabetes – a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes, and their baby are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you suspect you may have gestational diabetes seek urgent medical attention. For more info

Signs of diabetes

Often there are no symptoms if you are in the early stages of developing diabetes and many people dismiss the signs as simply part of getting older.

Symptoms include:

  • excessive thirst
  • passing more urine
  • tired or lethargic
  • always hungry
  • cuts that heal slowly
  • itching, skin infections
  • blurred vision
  • mood swings, headaches, dizziness or leg cramps
  • gradually gaining weight (type 2)
Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. Please consult your doctor about your individual medical needs.

For more information about diabetes, visit Diabetes Australia or Health Direct.

Are you at risk?

Take this short questionnaire to check your risk of type 2 diabetes.

What people are saying about MyHealthTest

"I am a pharmacist in a suburban community pharmacy in the ACT. I found the test very easy to use and can already see its application in helping people living with diabetes. I see your test as convenient as both a screening tool and for patients with diabetes who do not receive regular review by their GP (i.e. every 3 months as recommended for venous HbA1c monitoring) or who have less than ideally controlled diabetes as a handy, do-it-yourself monitoring measure."

Kevin Mullins – Pharmacist ACT



"Up until now they have to draw blood from your arm, like you are giving blood or when you have any sort of blood test. MyHealthTest it comes to me, I do it, I put it in a envelope and I post it."

Louise – Living with type 2 diabetes, ACT



"My biggest fear Is having the intravenous blood test and I absolutely hate that and I avoid it. A little bit of blood at the end of your finger is fine, rather than having a needle jabbed in your vein."

Shauna – Living with type 1 diabetes, ACT



"We have had some interesting issues with younger people with diabetes and I think this is the sort of tool they are looking for. It is convenient, it is quick and they don’t have to break their daily routine to have the test done."

Anna Pino – President of Diabetes ACT



"This is prime example of a great health innovation, both lowering the costs and making diagnostic more accessible to people. There is a whole range of tests which could be done in the same way."

Marcus Dawe – Innovation Canberra



"I am extremely impressed by this health management service and I will be telling all my friends about it. My congratulations to everyone involved with this program and thanks ever so much."

Oliver – ACT

HbA1c or glycated haemoglobin is an indication of your average blood glucose over the previous 8-12 weeks. It’s used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and those people that have what’s called pre-diabetes (a raised blood sugar level, but it’s not raised enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes). HbA1c is also used to monitor blood glucose levels regularly in people with diagnosed diabetes. For more information see the tab About diabetes on this page

The HbA1c test is used to diagnose and manage diabetes. It is not suitable for everyone.

HbA1c tests should not be used as an indicator of diabetes for:

  • Children and young people
  • Women who are currently pregnant or have been pregnant in the past 2 months
  • People with suspected type 1 diabetes
  • People with short duration of diabetic symptoms
  • People at high risk of diabetes who are acutely ill
  • People taking drugs that may cause a rapid rise in glucose, such as corticosteroids or antipsychotic drugs (for less than 2 months)
  • People with acute pancreatic damage or who have undergone pancreatic surgery
  • People with kidney failure

Conditions that affect your red blood cells or haemoglobin can also affect your HbA1c results. These conditions include anaemia, iron deficiency, vitamin deficiencies or kidney disease and other related conditions.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about a test service.

The HbA1c test is a different test from the blood glucose test that people with diabetes do frequently. Both measurements are important when managing diabetes.

A blood glucose test is done several times a day, (usually with a fingerprick and small device called a glucose meter), and gives a snapshot of your blood sugar level at that point in time.

The HbA1c test gives an indication of what’s been happening over a longer period. The red blood cells in your body survive between 8-12 weeks before renewing. When your body processes sugar, glucose in the blood stream naturally attaches to haemoglobin, becoming glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). The HbA1c test measures your average blood glucose level over that 2-3 month duration, providing a long-term gauge of blood glucose control and indicator of diabetes.

Note: The HbA1c value, which is measured in mmol/mol, should not be confused with a blood glucose level which is measured in mmol/l.

Your results will be reported using two measurements % and mmol/mol. A new way of reporting HbA1c levels is being introduced around the world. This will help avoid confusion with the daily blood glucose levels frequently measured by people with diabetes.

Your result will be referenced to one of three categories indicating that:

(a) You may have diabetes

(b) You may be at high risk of developing diabetes

(c) Diabetes is not currently likely

If you are living with diabetes your doctor will likely recommend you check your HbA1c levels up to four times per year to check you are staying within the levels that are right for you, particularly if you are making diet and lifestyle changes and/or medication changes. However, if you have good control and are managing your blood sugar levels well, you may only need to monitor it once per year. Our subscription service allows you to choose the intervals at which you would like to check your HbA1c and we’ll send you a test kit each time you’re due.

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes, how frequently you check your blood sugar levels is generally based on your level of risk, based on the AUSDRISK survey. Diabetes Australia recommend everyone over the age of 40 years should be checking their blood sugar levels annually.

Some of the glucose in the blood binds to the haemoglobin inside your red blood cells. Therefore, conditions that affect your red blood cells or haemoglobin can affect your HbA1c results. Such conditions include for example anaemia, iron deficiency, vitamin deficiencies or kidney disease amongst others. If there is any possibility that you may have a condition affecting your red blood cells or haemoglobin you should consult with your doctor before taking an HbA1c test.

It is important to note that blood test results obtained from different laboratories can and do vary. MyHealthTest results for HbA1c may be slightly higher than other laboratories. This should be considered if comparing results to those from other labs.

A subscription to check your blood sugar levels regularly not only saves money but helps you stay on top of your health and involves three simple steps:

  1. 1.   Simply select the option in the webstore “Subscribe and Save” and choose how often you would like to check your blood sugar levels. For example, you may want to check every 3 months, so you would use the arrows to select the number 3 to receive a test kit in the post every 3 months.
  2. 2.   Your first order will be processed immediately and charged at the rate listed at time of purchase. Subsequent tests will be charged at the advertised price on the business day your test is due to be sent. In that way, if there is a deal on you won’t miss out. The standard subscriber rate for the diabetes test is $29.
  3. 3.  When your next test is due, your card will be charged for the test and it will be shipped out automatically at the nominated interval – be sure to keep your details up to date by logging into your account to manage your subscription.

To learn more about subscriptions see our general FAQ page.

To find your nearest MyHealthTest Diabetes (HbA1c) Test Service stockist click here.

Pathology results from different laboratories can and do vary. This should be considered if comparing to results from other labs.

MyHealthTest test uses dried blood spot samples using laboratory techniques which differ from traditional whole blood testing. The MyHealthTest test results have been validated and compared to traditional testing to ensure that you are given an accurate and reliable result. For more information click here to see a video.

If you have further questions, please view our general frequently asked questions.

Once your sample arrives at our pathology lab, we’ll send you an email notifying you that your sample is being processed. Once your sample has been analysed by the pathology lab you will receive another email to let you know your results are ready and provide instructions on how to login to your personal MyHealthTest secure website to view your results. Results are generally ready within a week. If you haven’t received your results within a few days of receiving our notification email, please check your Junk or Spam email folders. If you’re unable to locate your results, please contact us.

Diabetes (HbA1c) Test Service

MyHealthTest’s fingerprick blood test was developed by researchers from the Australian National University and aims to improve the access and convenience of blood testing for chronic conditions.

Their study published in BMC Clinical Pathology in 2015 found comparable results between the MyHealthTest Diabetes HbA1c dried blood spot test and traditional whole blood testing.

This work was also accepted at the 2015 ADS/ADEA Annual Scientific Meeting where the following poster was presented: Time-dependent effects of HbA1c levels measured through dried blood spot sampling.

The dried blood spot HbA1c test results showed a high correlation and comparable precision to conventional whole blood HbA1c test results, demonstrating that dried blood spot HbA1c testing is a viable, accurate alternative to traditional pathology methods. With imprecision <3%, dried blood spot testing is superior to many point of care HbA1c testing units.



Table 1 – Characteristics of the studied population



AllNo diabetesType 1 diabetesType 2 diabetes
Gender (Males:Females)51 M : 64 F20 M : 28 F2 M : 9 F28 M : 28 F
Age (years; mean ± SD)55.9 ± 15.346.2 ± 14.445.0 ± 12.864.8 ± 10.0
WB HbA1c (%; mean ± SD)6.22 ± 1.11%5.41 ± 0.35%7.80 ± 0.81%6.61 ± 1.11%

Note: WB = whole blood; SD = standard deviation





Bland-Altman plots of capillary dried blood spot samples from days 0, 4, 7 and 14. Dashed lines represent 95 % limits of agreement; full lines represent biases. WB = whole blood on D0; cap = capillary; DBS = dried blood spot. MyHealthTest accept DBS samples up to 11 days after sample collection.



Measurement Range:
4-15% NGSP
20-140 mmol/mol IFCC
(at a normal haemoglobin (Hb) concentration of 9.3 mmol/l)
Reference Interval:
≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) May have diabetes
6.0 – 6.4% (42-47 mmol/mol)    At risk of developing diabetes
<6.0% (42 mmol/mol) Diabetes not currently likely
Accuracy (bias):Positive bias <0.4% HbA1c NGSP
Imprecision (Repeatability):1.3% CV
Imprecision (Reproducibility):3.5% CV at 6.5% HbA1c (NGSP), 2.5% CV at 9.9% HbA1c (NGSP)
Stability: ≤11 days

Testing has shown that after holding dried blood spot samples at 46°C for 2 days there is a slight increase in the HbA1c level from people with an HbA1c of 7.5% and higher. Therefore, there may be a small variation in results if samples are subjected to extreme temperature conditions.

Interferences:

Individuals with an iron deficiency anemia may give high HbA1c mmol/mol.

Individuals with haemolytic disease or other conditions with shortened red blood cell survival may exhibit a substantial reduction in HbA1c.

Samples containing high amounts of glycated fetal haemoglobin (HbF) >10% may result in lower HbA1c values than expected.

*Further information on measurement uncertainty is available upon request.



HbA1c and diabetes diagnosis

Glycated haemoglobin, or HbA1c, is commonly measured in the management of diabetes. The test has more recently been endorsed as a diagnostic test for Type 2 diabetes by the World Health Organisation, the International Diabetes Federation and by an Australian Diabetes Society expert committee. These recommendations have been outlined in a 2012 article published in the Medical Journal of Australia.

HbA1c has now been approved for the diagnosis of diabetes in Australia.

More information:

The HbA1c diabetes test checks your average blood glucose levels over the last 2-3 months and reports on whether you may have diabetes, or may be developing type 2 diabetes, or whether diabetes is unlikely for you at this time.

This test can also be used to help with long term management of diabetes. If you are living with diabetes this is another way you can take the HbA1c test that your doctor recommends every 3 to 6 months to make sure that your average blood sugar is staying in the healthy range.

Our blood test service is one small way to make your life easier. There’s no need to squeeze a visit to the pathology collection centre into your day and no needles to worry about. We only need a couple spots of blood provided on a specialised collection card. Our dried blood spot test for HbA1c levels has been found to be comparable to testing with traditional whole blood samples.

If your HbA1c level is raised your healthcare provider can use this information to help guide you to the next steps to best manage your health.

How It Works

Simply order your tests online (or buy in store) and take a fingerprick sample of blood at home, at a time that suits you.

Return your samples to us by post, and our quality controlled, accredited laboratory will process your results.

Your results will be delivered via our secure website in a matter of days and you can share with your doctor or others as you wish.

The HbA1c (or glycated haemoglobin) test measures your average blood sugar levels over the previous 2 to 3 months.

You can use this test to:

  • Check if you may be developing diabetes (pre-diabetes)
  • Identify if you may have type 2 diabetes
  • Check that your health is on track and that diabetes is not likely at this stage
  • Manage your existing diabetes

If you have diabetes, you will be familiar with the HbA1c test that your doctor arranges every few months to help you manage and monitor your condition. The HbA1c test may be used regularly to monitor your diabetes control, particularly if you have had a recent change in medication.

Keeping your HbA1c level within the target range recommended by your doctor will lower your risk of serious diabetes complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and lower limb amputation.

Note: This HbA1c test is not to be used in the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and is not recommended for the diagnosis of gestational (pregnancy) diabetes, or if you have certain other health conditions. Please consult your doctor.

The HbA1c test is used to diagnose and manage diabetes. It is not suitable for everyone. HbA1c tests should not be used as an indicator of diabetes for:

  • Children and young adults
  • Pregnant women or women who have been pregnant in the past 2 months
  • People with possible type 1 diabetes
  • People who have only had symptoms of diabetes for a short period
  • People at high risk of diabetes who are acutely ill
  • People taking drugs that may cause a rapid rise in blood sugar (blood glucose), such as corticosteroids or antipsychotic drugs (for less than 2 months)
  • People with damage to the pancreas or who have had surgery of the pancreas
  • People with kidney failure

If there’s a possibility you have a condition that affects your red blood cells or haemoglobin, you should consult with your doctor before taking an HbA1c test.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about a test service.

HbA1c measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2-3 months, so it's important to check your levels regularly. This helps in the early detection of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, by letting you know if your blood sugar levels are creeping up beyond the healthy range.

And, there's a really easy way to keep track of your average blood sugar levels over time using our subscription service.

Perhaps you need to check your blood sugar level every 3 months? Or maybe you'd like to check your risk once a year? Our subscription service makes it easy – simply tell us how often you want to take your test and we'll take care of the rest. We'll send you your new collection kit when it's time to do your next check, and it's affordable too – you only pay for each test service when it's time to send you a new kit.

So, do you know how your blood sugar levels are tracking?

Early detection could be your key to reversing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. And Diabetes NSW & ACT now recommend regular testing for everyone over the age of 40.

If you subscribe to regular tests, you'll save more than 15% OFF the single test service price. A minimum purchase of two test services is required to take advantage of the subscription savings. Conditions apply, please read our frequently asked questions and Terms and Conditions.

You can track your HbA1c levels over time, because each time you take the test, your results will be recorded and shown in tables and a graph, a little bit like viewing your phone or electricity bill. You will be able to see at a glance how your HbA1c levels are changing over time, making it easier for you to monitor and manage your health. You can set up to automatically share your results with your doctor or whoever you choose, or you can easily print out your results to take to your doctor if you prefer.

Facts:
1 person every 5min

develop diabetes every day.

Approx. 1.2 million

Australians have officially been diagnosed with diabetes.

Approx. 2.45 million

Australians have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

More than 100,000

Australians have developed diabetes in the past year.

Develop diabetes every day.
Australians have officially been diagnosed with diabetes.
Australians have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Australians have developed diabetes in the past year.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to process blood glucose (blood sugar) effectively. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to several debilitating conditions including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and lower limb amputations. There are four main types of diabetes:

  • Pre-diabetes – Where blood glucose levels are higher than the healthy range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes people with pre-diabetes may go on to develop type 2 diabetes. For more info
  • Type 1 – This is an autoimmune condition. There is no cure and it cannot be prevented. Onset of type 1 diabetes occurs abruptly with obvious symptoms. If you suspect you may have type 1 diabetes seek urgent medical attention. For more info
  • Type 2 – This is a progressive condition developing over a period of years. Some risks of developing type 2 diabetes are unavoidable such as family history and ethnic background, but lifestyle choices play a big part. For more info
  • Gestational diabetes – a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes, and their baby are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you suspect you may have gestational diabetes seek urgent medical attention. For more info

Signs of diabetes

Often there are no symptoms if you are in the early stages of developing diabetes and many people dismiss the signs as simply part of getting older.

Symptoms include:

  • excessive thirst
  • passing more urine
  • tired or lethargic
  • always hungry
  • cuts that heal slowly
  • itching, skin infections
  • blurred vision
  • mood swings, headaches, dizziness or leg cramps
  • gradually gaining weight (type 2)
Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. Please consult your doctor about your individual medical needs.

For more information about diabetes, visit Diabetes Australia or Health Direct.

Are you at risk?

Take this short questionnaire to check your risk of type 2 diabetes.

What people are saying about MyHealthTest

"I am a pharmacist in a suburban community pharmacy in the ACT. I found the test very easy to use and can already see its application in helping people living with diabetes. I see your test as convenient as both a screening tool and for patients with diabetes who do not receive regular review by their GP (i.e. every 3 months as recommended for venous HbA1c monitoring) or who have less than ideally controlled diabetes as a handy, do-it-yourself monitoring measure."

Kevin Mullins – Pharmacist ACT



"Up until now they have to draw blood from your arm, like you are giving blood or when you have any sort of blood test. MyHealthTest it comes to me, I do it, I put it in a envelope and I post it."

Louise – Living with type 2 diabetes, ACT



"My biggest fear Is having the intravenous blood test and I absolutely hate that and I avoid it. A little bit of blood at the end of your finger is fine, rather than having a needle jabbed in your vein."

Shauna – Living with type 1 diabetes, ACT



"We have had some interesting issues with younger people with diabetes and I think this is the sort of tool they are looking for. It is convenient, it is quick and they don’t have to break their daily routine to have the test done."

Anna Pino – President of Diabetes ACT



"This is prime example of a great health innovation, both lowering the costs and making diagnostic more accessible to people. There is a whole range of tests which could be done in the same way."

Marcus Dawe – Innovation Canberra



"I am extremely impressed by this health management service and I will be telling all my friends about it. My congratulations to everyone involved with this program and thanks ever so much."

Oliver – ACT

HbA1c or glycated haemoglobin is an indication of your average blood glucose over the previous 8-12 weeks. It’s used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and those people that have what’s called pre-diabetes (a raised blood sugar level, but it’s not raised enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes). HbA1c is also used to monitor blood glucose levels regularly in people with diagnosed diabetes. For more information see the tab About diabetes on this page

The HbA1c test is used to diagnose and manage diabetes. It is not suitable for everyone.

HbA1c tests should not be used as an indicator of diabetes for:

  • Children and young people
  • Women who are currently pregnant or have been pregnant in the past 2 months
  • People with suspected type 1 diabetes
  • People with short duration of diabetic symptoms
  • People at high risk of diabetes who are acutely ill
  • People taking drugs that may cause a rapid rise in glucose, such as corticosteroids or antipsychotic drugs (for less than 2 months)
  • People with acute pancreatic damage or who have undergone pancreatic surgery
  • People with kidney failure

Conditions that affect your red blood cells or haemoglobin can also affect your HbA1c results. These conditions include anaemia, iron deficiency, vitamin deficiencies or kidney disease and other related conditions.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about a test service.

The HbA1c test is a different test from the blood glucose test that people with diabetes do frequently. Both measurements are important when managing diabetes.

A blood glucose test is done several times a day, (usually with a fingerprick and small device called a glucose meter), and gives a snapshot of your blood sugar level at that point in time.

The HbA1c test gives an indication of what’s been happening over a longer period. The red blood cells in your body survive between 8-12 weeks before renewing. When your body processes sugar, glucose in the blood stream naturally attaches to haemoglobin, becoming glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). The HbA1c test measures your average blood glucose level over that 2-3 month duration, providing a long-term gauge of blood glucose control and indicator of diabetes.

Note: The HbA1c value, which is measured in mmol/mol, should not be confused with a blood glucose level which is measured in mmol/l.

Your results will be reported using two measurements % and mmol/mol. A new way of reporting HbA1c levels is being introduced around the world. This will help avoid confusion with the daily blood glucose levels frequently measured by people with diabetes.

Your result will be referenced to one of three categories indicating that:

(a) You may have diabetes

(b) You may be at high risk of developing diabetes

(c) Diabetes is not currently likely

If you are living with diabetes your doctor will likely recommend you check your HbA1c levels up to four times per year to check you are staying within the levels that are right for you, particularly if you are making diet and lifestyle changes and/or medication changes. However, if you have good control and are managing your blood sugar levels well, you may only need to monitor it once per year. Our subscription service allows you to choose the intervals at which you would like to check your HbA1c and we’ll send you a test kit each time you’re due.

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes, how frequently you check your blood sugar levels is generally based on your level of risk, based on the AUSDRISK survey. Diabetes Australia recommend everyone over the age of 40 years should be checking their blood sugar levels annually.

Some of the glucose in the blood binds to the haemoglobin inside your red blood cells. Therefore, conditions that affect your red blood cells or haemoglobin can affect your HbA1c results. Such conditions include for example anaemia, iron deficiency, vitamin deficiencies or kidney disease amongst others. If there is any possibility that you may have a condition affecting your red blood cells or haemoglobin you should consult with your doctor before taking an HbA1c test.

It is important to note that blood test results obtained from different laboratories can and do vary. MyHealthTest results for HbA1c may be slightly higher than other laboratories. This should be considered if comparing results to those from other labs.

A subscription to check your blood sugar levels regularly not only saves money but helps you stay on top of your health and involves three simple steps:

  1. 1.   Simply select the option in the webstore “Subscribe and Save” and choose how often you would like to check your blood sugar levels. For example, you may want to check every 3 months, so you would use the arrows to select the number 3 to receive a test kit in the post every 3 months.
  2. 2.   Your first order will be processed immediately and charged at the rate listed at time of purchase. Subsequent tests will be charged at the advertised price on the business day your test is due to be sent. In that way, if there is a deal on you won’t miss out. The standard subscriber rate for the diabetes test is $29.
  3. 3.  When your next test is due, your card will be charged for the test and it will be shipped out automatically at the nominated interval – be sure to keep your details up to date by logging into your account to manage your subscription.

To learn more about subscriptions see our general FAQ page.

To find your nearest MyHealthTest Diabetes (HbA1c) Test Service stockist click here.

Pathology results from different laboratories can and do vary. This should be considered if comparing to results from other labs.

MyHealthTest test uses dried blood spot samples using laboratory techniques which differ from traditional whole blood testing. The MyHealthTest test results have been validated and compared to traditional testing to ensure that you are given an accurate and reliable result. For more information click here to see a video.

If you have further questions, please view our general frequently asked questions.

Once your sample arrives at our pathology lab, we’ll send you an email notifying you that your sample is being processed. Once your sample has been analysed by the pathology lab you will receive another email to let you know your results are ready and provide instructions on how to login to your personal MyHealthTest secure website to view your results. Results are generally ready within a week. If you haven’t received your results within a few days of receiving our notification email, please check your Junk or Spam email folders. If you’re unable to locate your results, please contact us.

Diabetes (HbA1c) Test Service

MyHealthTest’s fingerprick blood test was developed by researchers from the Australian National University and aims to improve the access and convenience of blood testing for chronic conditions.

Their study published in BMC Clinical Pathology in 2015 found comparable results between the MyHealthTest Diabetes HbA1c dried blood spot test and traditional whole blood testing.

This work was also accepted at the 2015 ADS/ADEA Annual Scientific Meeting where the following poster was presented: Time-dependent effects of HbA1c levels measured through dried blood spot sampling.

The dried blood spot HbA1c test results showed a high correlation and comparable precision to conventional whole blood HbA1c test results, demonstrating that dried blood spot HbA1c testing is a viable, accurate alternative to traditional pathology methods. With imprecision <3%, dried blood spot testing is superior to many point of care HbA1c testing units.



Table 1 – Characteristics of the studied population



AllNo diabetesType 1 diabetesType 2 diabetes
Gender (Males:Females)51 M : 64 F20 M : 28 F2 M : 9 F28 M : 28 F
Age (years; mean ± SD)55.9 ± 15.346.2 ± 14.445.0 ± 12.864.8 ± 10.0
WB HbA1c (%; mean ± SD)6.22 ± 1.11%5.41 ± 0.35%7.80 ± 0.81%6.61 ± 1.11%

Note: WB = whole blood; SD = standard deviation





Bland-Altman plots of capillary dried blood spot samples from days 0, 4, 7 and 14. Dashed lines represent 95 % limits of agreement; full lines represent biases. WB = whole blood on D0; cap = capillary; DBS = dried blood spot. MyHealthTest accept DBS samples up to 11 days after sample collection.



Measurement Range:
4-15% NGSP
20-140 mmol/mol IFCC
(at a normal haemoglobin (Hb) concentration of 9.3 mmol/l)
Reference Interval:
≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) May have diabetes
6.0 – 6.4% (42-47 mmol/mol)    At risk of developing diabetes
<6.0% (42 mmol/mol) Diabetes not currently likely
Accuracy (bias):Positive bias <0.4% HbA1c NGSP
Imprecision (Repeatability):1.3% CV
Imprecision (Reproducibility):3.5% CV at 6.5% HbA1c (NGSP), 2.5% CV at 9.9% HbA1c (NGSP)
Stability: ≤11 days

Testing has shown that after holding dried blood spot samples at 46°C for 2 days there is a slight increase in the HbA1c level from people with an HbA1c of 7.5% and higher. Therefore, there may be a small variation in results if samples are subjected to extreme temperature conditions.

Interferences:

Individuals with an iron deficiency anemia may give high HbA1c mmol/mol.

Individuals with haemolytic disease or other conditions with shortened red blood cell survival may exhibit a substantial reduction in HbA1c.

Samples containing high amounts of glycated fetal haemoglobin (HbF) >10% may result in lower HbA1c values than expected.

*Further information on measurement uncertainty is available upon request.



HbA1c and diabetes diagnosis

Glycated haemoglobin, or HbA1c, is commonly measured in the management of diabetes. The test has more recently been endorsed as a diagnostic test for Type 2 diabetes by the World Health Organisation, the International Diabetes Federation and by an Australian Diabetes Society expert committee. These recommendations have been outlined in a 2012 article published in the Medical Journal of Australia.

HbA1c has now been approved for the diagnosis of diabetes in Australia.

More information: