Omega-3 Fatty Acid Test Service

$57

Check your levels of essential fatty acids also known as the Omega-3 Index

WHAT’S INCLUDED

Fingerprick IconFingerprick sample collection kit
Secure IconSecure online results account
Results Tracking IconCustomised results sharing
Reply Paid IconPre-paid sample return
Lab IconLaboratory analysis
Shipping IconFree shipping

Why should I take this test?

This test gives you a snapshot of the amount of Omega-3 fatty acids in your cells. These essential fatty acids are important to maintain and improve heart, brain, eye and joint health.

What’s the difference between the Basic Test and the PLUS Test?

The Omega-3 Index PLUS Test Service gives a more holistic picture of your essential fatty acids. In addition to the basic Omega-3 index test it also includes:

  •  Trans Fat Index
  •  Omega-6: Omega-3 Ratio
  •  AA: EPA Ratio

Note: This test is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, prevent or mitigate any disease. 

Omega Quant Logo

Omega-3 Fatty Acid Test Service

$57

Check your levels of essential fatty acids also known as the Omega-3 Index.

WHAT’S INCLUDED

Fingerprick IconFingerprick sample collection kit
Secure IconSecure online results account
Results Tracking IconCustomised results sharing
Reply Paid IconPre-paid sample return
Lab IconLaboratory analysis
Shipping IconFree shipping

Why should I take this test?

This test gives you a snapshot of the amount of Omega-3 fatty acids in your cells. These essential fatty acids are important to maintain and improve heart, brain, eye and joint health.

What’s the difference between the Basic Test and the PLUS Test?

The Omega-3 Index PLUS Test Service gives a more holistic picture of your essential fatty acids. In addition to the basic Omega-3 index test it also includes:

– Trans Fat Index

– Omega-6: Omega-3 Ratio

– AA: EPA Ratio

Note: This test is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, prevent or mitigate any disease. 

The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Test Service offered by MyHealthTest is run and analysed by our partner laboratory, OmegaQuant. This test service does not fall under the MyHealthTest accreditation to ISO15189 and NPAAC standards and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, prevent or mitigate disease.

HOW IT WORKS

Follow these simple steps to get your blood test results without having to go to a pathology centre

 
Step One Device Image

Step 1: Order and Register

Order your test service online and have a collection kit delivered to your door. Register your kit on the OmegaQuant portal.

Step Two Prick Finger Image

Step 2: Collect & Return

Collect a simple fingerprick blood sample and mail it back reply-paid to our partner lab

Step 3: Lab Analysis

Our partner, OmegaQuant, will process your sample in their quality controlled Australian laboratory

Step Four Results Image

Step 4: View Results

Your results will be delivered via OmegaQuant’s secure website


What will the Omega-3 Index Basic Test show?

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fats that are not produced by your body so you need to obtain them from your diet. The Omega-3 index is the percent of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in your red blood cells.
Omega 3 EPA DHA Index Image
Your levels are indicative of the amount of omega-3s in your diet and how much your body is using. An Omega-3 Index range between 8-12% is considered desirable. An Omega-3 index between 8% and 12% is associated with lower risk for death from cardiovascular disease, whereas less than 4% is associated with higher risk.
Omega 3 Levels Image

Here is an example Basic Test report

What will the Omega-3 Index PLUS test show?

In addition to the Omega 3 index the PLUS test will also test your:

Trans Fat Index

Measure the level of synthetic trans fats in the blood that are commonly found in processed foods. High levels of blood trans fats are related to higher risk of heart disease. Blood levels of trans fats are directly related to how much trans fat we eat because our bodies cannot make these kinds of fatty acids. Blood levels of trans fats can be reduced by simple dietary changes.

Omega 6: Omega 3 Ratio

The Omega-6:Omega-3 ratio is an indicator of the body’s inflammatory response and provides analysis for seven omega-6 fatty acids and four omega-3 fatty acids. The total amount of omega-6s and omega-3s are divided by each other to get a ratio. Although inflammation is a normal and necessary bodily function, required to combat infection, a low omega-3 compared with omega-6 may contribute to an imbalanced inflammatory response and higher risk of chronic disease, such as diabetes, arthritis and heart failure.

AA: EPA Ratio

The AA:EPA ratio measures cellular inflammation in your body (often referred to as silent inflammation) that can indicate your future state of wellness and possibility of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have the ability to cause a lot of changes in the body. Having different levels of these two fatty acids could affect processes that impact inflammation and overall long term health. Having the correct balance is important. A high ratio can indicate your future state of wellness which can be addressed by changes in diet or introduction of supplements. AA and EPA also play a role in fever promotion, blood pressure regulation, and blood clotting.

Here is an example Plus Test report

Optimise your Omega-3 level

You can optimise your Omega-3 level in 3 easy steps:

  1. Measure: You won’t know if your Omega-3 Index is optimal just because you eat fish or take supplements — it must be measured.
  2. Modify: Once you know your Omega-3 Index, it can be optimized with simple dietary changes.
  3. Monitor: Testing your Omega-3 Index every 4 months will ensure that your levels stay optimal.

How is the Omega-3 Index different from other fatty acid profile tests?

The OmegaQuant test uses a single drop of blood to measure the Omega-3 index, which gives you an unbiased view of your dietary intake of omega-3s as well as a measure of heart disease risk.

Other fatty acid tests do not use the same analysis methods and cannot be interchanged with the Omega-3 Index. So your Omega-3 index (EPA+DHA), for example, might be 6.7% in Lab A and 5.2% in Lab B. Which one is “right?”

The unique method used by OmegaQuant has more research behind it than any other commercially-available test, and new studies continue to be published.

What is the target range for the Omega-3 Index?

The target Omega-3 Index is 8% and above, a level that current research indicates is associated with the lowest risk* for death from Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). This is also a typical level in Japan, a country with one of the lowest rates of sudden cardiac death in the world. On the other hand, an Index of 4% or less (which is common in the US) indicates the highest risk*. At present, there is no reason to suggest that the target should be different for men vs. women, or for different age groups.

*In this context, “risk” refers only to that associated with differing levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Risks associated with other factors such as cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, family history of CHD, smoking, or other cardiac conditions are completely independent of the Omega-3 Index.


Benefits of Knowing Your Omega-3 Index

Heart Icon

Heart Health

From a better functioning heart to healthier blood vessels, there are many reasons why people with higher omega-3 blood levels have better heart health.

Brain Icon

Brain Health

Omega-3s play a role in brain health during every phase of life - from infant brain development to maintaining cognitive function as we age.

Eye Icon

Eye Health

Omega-3 DHA is a main component of eyes, and having higher levels of omega-3s is related to better eye health and visual development.

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Overall Health

There are multiple benefits to the mind and body in having a higher omega-3 index, all of which contribute to slower aging.


What are omega-3 fatty acids?

Omega-3 fatty acids are important polyunsaturated fats that our bodies are unable to produce. Since our bodies are unable to make these essentially fatty acids, we have to get them from our diet. They are found in foods such as fish, nuts and seeds, and in dietary supplements, such as fish oil. These essential fats play an important role in our cardiovascular, brain and eye health.

Including Omega-3s as part of a healthy diet may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. The Omega-3s act to reduce triglycerides (unhealthy fat) in the body, increase good cholesterol (HDL), decrease bad cholesterol (LDL), thin the blood and reduce inflammation. The Heart Foundation recommends including in your diet 2-3 serves of fish per week (EPA, DHA, DPA n-3) and 1 gram of plant-sourced omega-3 (ALA) each day.

What are omega-6 fatty acids?

Like omega-3s, omega-6 fatty acids need to be obtained through the diet because the body can’t make them. The primary source of Omega-6s are vegetable oils, but they are also present in eggs, nuts, poultry and cereal grains.

The OmegaQuant test measures levels of seven fatty acids in the omega-6 family, but on average 85% of the total amount comes from only two, linoleic and arachidonic acids. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid and is the starting material for the synthesis of the other omega-6s, including arachidonic acid. The level of linoleic acid in your blood is generally influenced by the amount you eat over many months, whereas the level of arachidonic acid (and the other five omega-6 fatty acids) are primarily determined by your body’s metabolism. This means there is little you can do from a dietary perspective to alter the levels of six of the seven omega-6 fatty acids and making significant changes in linoleic acid blood levels via diet takes months to years.

There has been considerable controversy regarding whether omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid in particular, are “good” or “bad” for our health. Recent evidence reviewed by the Australian Heart Foundation demonstrate that replacing saturated fat in your diet with Omega-6 fatty acids lowers the risk of heart disease. The Foundation agrees with the recommendation of the American Heart Association that between 4% and 10% of calories be consumed as linoleic acid (12 to 24 grams per day).


How much omega-3 should I get from my diet?

We believe, if possible, that you should try and get your omega-3s from fish first. Some good choices are salmon, tuna and herring. Here is an infographic that lists how much EPA and DHA there is in certain fish. If fish is not an option for you, then we suggest taking an omega-3 supplement that contains EPA and DHA. If you choose to take a supplement, make sure you can locate these two omega-3s on the label, so you can add them up to see how much you are getting.

Can my Omega-3 Index be too high?

Having an Omega-3 index over 12% is very rare. About 3% of the individuals OmegaQuant have tested over the years had levels over 12%. There is no evidence that being over 12% is harmful but there is also no evidence to suggest that being over 12% offers extra benefits.

If I am vegan or vegetarian, how can I get to an Omega-3 Index of 8%?

If fish is not part of your diet for whatever reason you can still obtain your Omega-3s EPA and DHA from algal supplements. It is much more effective in raising your Omega-3 Index as opposed to other plant sources like flax and chia, which contain a totally different omega-3 called ALA.

If patients are taking omega-3 supplements, won’t their omega-3 index be above 8%?

No. There is no way to predict – for any given person – what his/her Omega-3 Index will be just by knowing how much fish they eat or how many capsules they take. Individual differences in metabolism, absorption, and genetics make it impossible to predict with certainty how a given person will respond to supplements.

Why don’t the EPA and DHA values add up to the Omega-3 Index on my dried blood spot (DBS) report?

Whole blood and red blood cells (RBC) are different starting materials and the EPA+DHA content of each is different, but highly correlated. Based on multiple experiments, OmegaQuant have derived a mathematical equation that converts the DBS EPA+DHA value into the corresponding RBC value (which is the Omega-3 Index). Therefore, the sum of EPA and DHA in the DBS report will usually be slightly different from the Omega-3 Index.

If you have further questions, please view our general frequently asked questions

The following information is intended for clinicians, and consumers who want more details about this test.

OmegaQuant’s fingerprick blood test for Omega fatty acids was developed by Dr Harris, an internationally recognised expert in omega-3 fatty acids. Dr Harris co-invented the Omega-3 index in 2004 and made it commercially available in 2009. To date, the Omega-3 index has been used as the standard measure of omega-3 status in more than 200 clinical studies. Research undertaken by Dr Harris and the OmegaQuant team found comparable results between the dried blood spot test and traditional red blood cell testing.

Linear Regression of DBS Omega-3 Image

Figure 1. Linear Regression of DBS Omega-3 index compared to red blood cell (r = 0.98, n = 147)

Assay type: Gas chromatography – flame ionisation
Instrument: Gas chromatography – flame ionisation
Sample:Fingerprick dried blood spot (DBS)
Measurand:Omega fatty acids in whole blood
Measurement Range:
Omega-3 index is 1 to 30%
Omega-6:Omega-3 ratio is 0.1:1 to 50:1
AA:EPA ratio is 0.1:1 to 200:1
Trans Fats is 0% to 5%
Desirable Range:
Omega-3 index is 8-12%
Omega-6:Omega-3 ratio is 3:1 to 5:1
AA:EPA ratio is 2.5:1 to 11:1.
Trans Fats is 0.30% to 2.42%
Inter-assay precision:3.5% CV at Omega-3 index of 7.9%, 4.9% CV at Omega-3 index of 4.6%
Stability:28 days at room temperature
Interferences:N/A
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