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Prostate (PSA) Test Service

$45

Check the health of your prostate gland. This test can identify changes or problems in the prostate gland.

Fingerprick sample collection kit

Secured online results account

Customised results sharing

Pre-paid sample return

Laboratory analysis

Track your levels over time

Free shipping

WHAT'S INCLUDED

Fingerprick sample collection kit

Secured online results account

Customised results sharing

Pre-paid sample return

Laboratory analysis

Track your levels over time

Free shipping

Why should I take this test?

Check your prostate health

If you are male aged 50-69 years, (or over 40 with a family history of prostate cancer) a raised PSA level picked up early can delay or prevent serious consequences.

Monitor PSA levels

If you have been diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer and your doctor has recommended an active surveillance program, you know that regular PSA tests can detect changes, so you can act quickly.

This test is not suitable for use in advanced prostate disease, after radiation, chemotherapy or surgery of the prostate. There are also other limitations and factors that affect test results. Read and consider all information on this page before making your own decision about whether this PSA test is right for you.

Our Prostate, Thyroid and Cholesterol test services are currently unavailable.

Please register your details – as soon as the test services become available we will be in contact.

Why should I take this test?

Check your prostate health

If you are male aged 50-69 years, (or over 40 with a family history of prostate cancer) a raised PSA level picked up early can delay or prevent serious consequences.

Monitor PSA levels

If you have been diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer and your doctor has recommended an active surveillance program, you know that regular PSA tests can detect changes, so you can act quickly.

This test is not suitable for use in advanced prostate disease, after radiation, chemotherapy or surgery of the prostate. There are also other limitations and factors that affect test results. Read and consider all information on this page before making your own decision about whether this PSA test is right for you.
What is the PSA test?

Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a protein made in the prostate gland of a man. The PSA test is a simple, at-home fingerprick test that measures the level of total PSA in your blood and compares your result to the expected PSA levels for your age. It can help indicate if there is a problem with the prostate.

The PSA test is the first line test to check for a man’s risk of prostate cancer, but it is not specific to cancer. A raised PSA level can indicate other common prostate issues, like an enlarged prostate (which is common and occurs with age) or an infection and least commonly, prostate cancer. In some cases, men who have prostate cancer do not have a high PSA test result. To learn more, visit the Your Prostate section on this page.

You can use this test to:

  • Check that your PSA level is within the expected range for your age
  • Detect changes within your prostate
  • Monitor your prostate condition in consultation with your doctor

If your PSA level is above the expected level for your age, your doctor will need to investigate further based on your individual circumstances.

Some pathology laboratories in Australia offer additional tests to further define your risk of prostate cancer, this is outlined in the Clinical Information section. These tests may be recommended by your doctor after your initial PSA test and visit with your doctor.

HOW IT WORKS

Our blood test service is one small way to make your life easier. There’s no need to squeeze a visit to the pathology collection centre into your day and no needles to worry about. We only need three spots of blood on a specialised collection card. Our dried blood spot test for PSA levels has been validated and compared to traditional pathology methods. Our Clinical Information section provides more information for clinicians.

Simply order your tests online and take a fingerprick sample of blood at home, at a time that suits you.

Return your samples to us by post, and our quality controlled laboratory will process your results.

Your results will be delivered via our secure website within a week and you can share with your doctor or others as you wish.

This is an entirely personal decision and should be made after considering all the information outlined here or in consultation with your doctor. You should consider that a raised PSA level does not always mean prostate cancer, but that something is going on within your prostate - and sometimes, in cases where prostate cancer is present, your PSA level may be low or within the expected level for your age.

The Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand state that the PSA test is still the best test currently available for the early detection of prostate cancer.

If your PSA level is raised, this will be clearly marked on your results. Take these results to your healthcare provider to discuss the options available to best manage your health based on your individual circumstances.

If you have already been diagnosed with a low risk prostate problem and your doctor has recommended an active surveillance program, you will be familiar with the PSA test your doctor arranges every three to six months. If your doctor is happy that you use the MyHealthTest to monitor your PSA, it is recommended you re-take the test soon after your regular laboratory measures your PSA, this way your doctor can compare and interpret any slight differences which normally occur between different pathology laboratories. You can learn more about these differences here.

It’s important to make your own decision about whether to have a PSA test after a discussion with your doctor. If you would like to read more about PSA testing visit Andrology Australia or Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

This test is not suitable for ongoing monitoring of individuals with advanced prostate cancer. The Cancer Council does not recommend active surveillance for individuals with advanced prostate cancer, who already have symptoms.

This test is not suitable for monitoring prostate problems after treatment such as prostate surgery, radiation or chemotherapy.

The prostate specific antigen (PSA) test measures the amount of total PSA in your blood. A raised level of PSA can indicate changes or potential problems with the prostate gland.

The MyHealthTest PSA test report contains:

  • Your test result for PSA
  • An indication if it is outside the expected range
  • Links to key information to help you understand your result

Here is an example report

There are some activities that can temporarily increase your PSA level. It is important to know what things to avoid before a PSA test so that your results will be as accurate as possible and do not cause you to stress over high numbers due to temporary changes.

Strenuous exercise: your PSA level can temporarily rise due to strenuous exercise such as cycling or sexual activity for up to 48 hours before taking the test.

Medical considerations: it’s recommended you wait six to eight weeks before taking the test if you’ve had a biopsy, exam or surgery of the prostate, urinary tract infection (UTI), or a pelvic injury.

Medications: various medications can affect your PSA levels and your doctor will take this into consideration when interpreting the results. For more information these are outlined in the Clinical Information section.

Incorrect sample collection: it's important to follow the provided sample collection guidelines carefully, so we can ensure the accuracy of your test result. Incorrect collection of your blood is likely to affect your test result.

FRONT OF CARD

BACK OF CARD

Different laboratories: blood test results from different laboratories can and do vary - this is because different laboratories may use different methods of testing. This should be considered if you’re comparing your MyHealthTest results to those from other labs, for more information please read our Frequently Asked Questions tab.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about PSA tests or using this test service.

The PSA test is used to detect changes in a man’s prostate gland. It is not suitable for everyone.

PSA tests should not be used for:

  • Women or children
  • Men under 40 years who have no family history of prostate cancer
  • Men 70 years or older (unless recommended by your doctor)
  • Men who have already undergone treatment on their prostate such as surgery, radiation or chemotherapy.

Men should always make an individual informed decision about PSA testing based on the latest available evidence on the benefits and potential harms of testing.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about PSA testing or using this test service.

The decision to check PSA levels is entirely personal and should be done in consultation with your doctor. If you have decided that testing is right for you, there's a really easy way to track your PSA levels over time using our subscription service.

You can track your PSA levels over time, because each time you take the test, your results will be recorded and shown in tables and a graph, a little bit like viewing your phone or electricity bill. You will be able to see at a glance how your PSA levels are changing over time, making it easier for you to monitor and manage your health. You can set up to automatically share your results with your doctor or others as you choose, or you can easily print out your results to take to your health care provider if you prefer.

The Consensus Guidelines developed in 2016 by the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia provide recommendations on the use of PSA testing for the early detection of prostate cancer. This includes men aged between 50-69 testing regularly and men as young as 40 with a family history of prostate cancer (or a mother/sister with breast cancer) getting checked at least once prior to 50.

Perhaps you are on an active surveillance program and need to check your levels every 3 or 6 months? Or maybe you'd like to make sure you remember to do your screening test regularly, as you’ve agreed with your GP. Our subscription service makes it easy – simply tell us how often you want to take your test and we'll take care of the rest. We'll send you your new collection kit when it's time to do your next check, and it's affordable too – you only pay for each test service when it's time to send you a new kit.

Early detection could be your key to avoiding aggressive treatments with serious side effects.

If you subscribe to regular tests, you'll save more than 15% OFF the single test service price. A minimum purchase of two test services is required to take advantage of the subscription savings. Conditions apply, please read our frequently asked questions and Terms and Conditions.

Facts:
  • About 1 in 7 Australian men over the age of 40 will suffer from problems with their prostate - see Prostate conditions
  • Most of the time, a raised PSA blood test is not due to cancer
  • More Australian men die of prostate cancer each year than women do of breast cancer
  • It’s estimated, more than 17,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2018

The prostate gland is a male reproductive organ, which sits underneath the bladder and surrounds the top part of the urethra; it starts out about the size of a walnut and grows as you get older. The prostate secretes the fluid that nourishes the sperm.

Source: www.cancer.org.au

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is a protein made in the prostate gland. PSA is present in the blood in low levels and the level increases with age as the prostate enlarges.

As a man ages, the level of PSA in the blood increases. It’s not uncommon for men to experience prostate or urinary problems as they age (from about the age of 50).

There are 3 common medical conditions of the prostate:

Prostatitis: inflammation of the prostate gland, usually caused by a bacterial infection or non-bacterial inflammation. For more info

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): it’s the most common prostate condition – a non-cancerous growth or enlargement of the prostate, usually occurring in men over 40. For more info

Prostate cancer: where cells in the prostate grow and divide abnormally, forming one or more tumours. Only about 1 in 3 cases of raised PSA is cancer. It’s more common in men over 50. For more info

Some men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer may decide against immediate treatment (due to the side effects of surgery and radiotherapy) and commence what is called active surveillance.

In consultation with your doctor, a PSA test every three to six months (along with physical examination and possibly biopsies) can be used to monitor your condition.

For more information on active surveillance for prostate cancer speak to your doctor and visit Cancer Council or the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia.

What people are saying about MyHealthTest

“My father was diagnosed with prostate cancer and then it spread to his bones and he was gone within a year, he left it too late to go to the doctor. I knew that having a family history meant that I should get checked, but it’s embarrassing to talk about it and I don’t like going to doctors. I was at first worried about doing the online test and waiting for my results, but it was easy, it came in the post and I did it just before going to work and didn’t have to take time off work. I was relieved to get my results and will be checking it regularly now.”

David, NSW

The MyHealthTest Prostate (PSA) test is a simple, at-home fingerprick test that measures the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in your blood.

PSA is a protein made in the prostate gland. A PSA blood test can identify changes or problems in the prostate. It’s also used as a first-line test for prostate cancer. However, PSA is not specific to cancer – a higher PSA result can also indicate other common prostate issues, like an enlarged prostate or an infection.

If your PSA level is raised, your doctor will investigate this further and discuss the options available to best manage your health based on your particular circumstances.

Yes, but our PSA test is not a replacement for a consultation with a healthcare professional.

We recommend you talk to your doctor about your specific concerns before you take a PSA test, so you understand the information you will receive.

Once you’ve discussed PSA testing with your doctor and decide if it’s right for you, you can order MyHealthTest’s PSA test service online, which offers a simple and convenient testing alternative to visiting a local pathology centre.

Once you receive your results, if your PSA level is elevated – or you’re concerned about some other aspect of your test result – we recommend discussing any concerns with a healthcare professional.

Many people like to pro-actively monitor their health and then discuss their results with their healthcare provider. Additionally, some people don’t visit their GP regularly, or live in rural/remote areas, and this test service gives them the opportunity to monitor their own health.

If you’ve discussed PSA testing with your doctor and decide it’s right for you, our fingerprick blood test service is an easy and convenient alternative to visiting and having blood taken at a pathology centre.

You can order your sample collection kit online, which is mailed out to you. To take a fingerprick blood test, we only need a few spots of blood placed onto a special collection card that you post back to our Australian pathology lab.

We send the results directly to you via our secure website and you can share and discuss these results with your doctor if you choose.

MyHealthTest’s fingerprick blood testing service is reliable and accurate.

Research studies have shown PSA levels can be reliably measured from dried blood spots. Our dried blood spot sampling method has also been validated and is comparable to testing with traditional whole blood samples (e.g. having blood taken at a local pathology centre).

Find out more about dried blood spot testing and our state-of-the-art Australian pathology lab.

Your PSA level can temporarily rise due to activities such as, vigorous exercise, bike riding and recent sexual activity, as well as if you’ve had a urinary tract infection (UTI) or prostate examination. Even some medications may affect your PSA levels. We recommend you read the PSA Testing section and more technical details for clinicians outlined in the Clinical Information section.

Our PSA test service is not suitable for monitoring prostate problems after prostate surgery, radiation or chemotherapy.

A PSA blood test can identify changes or problems in the prostate gland. It’s also used as a first-line test for prostate cancer.

However, PSA is not specific to cancer – a higher PSA result can also indicate other prostate issues, like an enlarged prostate or an infection.

In some cases an individual with prostate cancer will not have a high PSA test result.

PSA levels also increase with age. This means an expected level for a healthy 75-year-old may be higher than the expected level for a 55-year-old.

If you record a higher PSA than the expected level for your age group (provided with your test results), please consult your doctor.

We recommend you read the PSA Testing section on this page.

Our PSA test service is currently available online from our webstore.

You may purchase this service for your own use or for an individual you care for i.e., another adult you are the authorised carer for.

Pathology results from different laboratories can and do vary. This should be considered if comparing to results from other labs.

MyHealthTest uses dried blood spot samples using laboratory techniques which differ from traditional whole blood testing. The MyHealthTest test results have been validated and compared to traditional testing to ensure that you are given an accurate and reliable result. For more information click here to see a video https://www.patientpower.info.

If your PSA test result is above the expected range for your age group this will be indicated on your report as *HIGH.

An example report can be found here

There is no critical level for PSA that requires urgent medical attention. If you have a level above the expected level it is recommended you take this to your doctor within the next few weeks. Your doctor will work with you on the next steps on how to best manage your health.

If you have further questions, please view our general frequently asked questions

The following information is intended for clinicians, and consumers who want more details about this test.

MyHealthTest’s fingerprick blood test for total prostate specific antigen (PSA) was developed to increase accessibility of getting a blood test conveniently.

The test will be of use to men who, after consultation with their healthcare provider, have decided that they wish to monitor their PSA level but due to access issues (geographic, physical or time constraints) are finding it difficult to present for blood tests as planned.

The test may also be used to improve the accessibility and convenience of blood testing in an active surveillance program under medical supervision.

The MyHealthTest PSA test is a screening tool to identify individuals who may have a problem with their prostate. This test is not suitable for monitoring for recurrence of prostate problems after treatment via prostatectomy, radiation or chemotherapy. Test performance has not been studied on samples above 34µg/L. Consequently, we do not recommend use of this methodology for testing patients with established, advanced prostate cancer where a higher result might be of interest (e.g. monitoring metastatic disease)

It does not include additional tests sometimes used to further categorise the risk of prostate cancer. These tests may be recommended by a doctor after an initial PSA test and consultation.

  • Free PSA test – measures the PSA molecules in the blood that are not attached to other blood proteins (free PSA). This test may be performed if a PSA level is high. A low level of free PSA may indicate prostate cancer.
  • Prostate Health Index (PHI) – a blood test that measures three different forms of the PSA protein. This test is not widely used in Australia.
  • Age related median PSA – if an individual’s PSA concentration is above the median level for his age, his probability of prostate cancer is above average.

MyHealthTest do not offer these additional tests, we recommend speaking with a doctor to discuss if further testing is required.

Dried blood spot results obtained for PSA are comparable to serum samples collected by venepuncture and analysed by the same method (DELFIA time resolved fluorescence immunoassay); and has clinically acceptable precision to be used as a tool for both screening and in active surveillance for prostate conditions.

Figure 1. Total PSA Bland Altman and Linear Regression analysis of serum vs DBS

Assay type: DELFIA time resolved fluorescence (Perkin Elmer)
Instrument: Victor2D (Perkin Elmer)
Sample:Fingerprick dried blood spot (DBS)
Measurand:Total PSA concentration in whole blood
Measurement Range:0.5 – 250 µg/L
Limit of Quantitation:0.5 µg/L
Clinical target concentration:
PSA DBS reference interval (<50 yrs.): <2.2 µg/L
PSA DBS reference interval (50 – 60 yrs.): <3.9 µg/L
PSA DBS reference interval (>60 yrs.): <6.9 µg/L
Repeatability (within-run precision):0.38 µg/L at 3 µg/L; 6.3% at 22 µg/L
Reproducibility (intermediate precision)*:11% at 3 µg/L; 8.5% at 22 µg/L
Stability:12 days
Interferences:
  • Human glandular kallikrein (HK2) cross reacts with total PSA and may falsely increase the reported value
  • Heterophilic antibodies in the patient sample may occasionally interfere with the assay, falsely elevating the reported value
  • High or low haematocrit outside the expected range of 39 – 53% may affect the reported total PSA value due to the nature of dried blood spots
Thermal stability:46°C for 2 days

*Further information on measurement uncertainty is available upon request.

Samples are stable for up to 12 days after collection and thermal stability testing confirmed that after holding dried blood spot samples at 46°C for two days there was no significant difference in the PSA values obtained.

When evaluating PSA test results there are several factors that need to be taken into consideration by doctors.

Various medications can artificially and temporarily affect PSA levels. These include:

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen can lower PSA
  • Cholesterol-lowering medications (statins) can lower PSA levels
  • Diuretics (used to treat high blood pressure, oedema)
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Supplements: used by body builders that can cause testosterone to rise.

Other factors that do not physically change PSA levels but may interfere with the test results, and are included in the table above.

An example test report can be viewed here

What is the PSA test?

Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a protein made in the prostate gland of a man. The PSA test is a simple, at-home fingerprick test that measures the level of total PSA in your blood and compares your result to the expected PSA levels for your age. It can help indicate if there is a problem with the prostate.

The PSA test is the first line test to check for a man’s risk of prostate cancer, but it is not specific to cancer. A raised PSA level can indicate other common prostate issues, like an enlarged prostate (which is common and occurs with age) or an infection and least commonly, prostate cancer. In some cases, men who have prostate cancer do not have a high PSA test result. To learn more, visit the Your Prostate section on this page.

You can use this test to:

  • Check that your PSA level is within the expected range for your age
  • Detect changes within your prostate
  • Monitor your prostate condition in consultation with your doctor

If your PSA level is above the expected level for your age, your doctor will need to investigate further based on your individual circumstances.

Some pathology laboratories in Australia offer additional tests to further define your risk of prostate cancer, this is outlined in the Clinical Information section. These tests may be recommended by your doctor after your initial PSA test and visit with your doctor.

HOW IT WORKS

Our blood test service is one small way to make your life easier. There’s no need to squeeze a visit to the pathology collection centre into your day and no needles to worry about. We only need three spots of blood on a specialised collection card. Our dried blood spot test for PSA levels has been validated and compared to traditional pathology methods. Our Clinical Information section provides more information for clinicians.

Simply order your tests online and take a fingerprick sample of blood at home, at a time that suits you.

Return your samples to us by post, and our quality controlled laboratory will process your results.

Your results will be delivered via our secure website within a week and you can share with your doctor or others as you wish.

This is an entirely personal decision and should be made after considering all the information outlined here or in consultation with your doctor. You should consider that a raised PSA level does not always mean prostate cancer, but that something is going on within your prostate - and sometimes, in cases where prostate cancer is present, your PSA level may be low or within the expected level for your age.

The Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand state that the PSA test is still the best test currently available for the early detection of prostate cancer.

If your PSA level is raised, this will be clearly marked on your results. Take these results to your healthcare provider to discuss the options available to best manage your health based on your individual circumstances.

If you have already been diagnosed with a low risk prostate problem and your doctor has recommended an active surveillance program, you will be familiar with the PSA test your doctor arranges every three to six months. If your doctor is happy that you use the MyHealthTest to monitor your PSA, it is recommended you re-take the test soon after your regular laboratory measures your PSA, this way your doctor can compare and interpret any slight differences which normally occur between different pathology laboratories. You can learn more about these differences here.

It’s important to make your own decision about whether to have a PSA test after a discussion with your doctor. If you would like to read more about PSA testing visit Andrology Australia or Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

This test is not suitable for ongoing monitoring of individuals with advanced prostate cancer. The Cancer Council does not recommend active surveillance for individuals with advanced prostate cancer, who already have symptoms.

This test is not suitable for monitoring prostate problems after treatment such as prostate surgery, radiation or chemotherapy.

The prostate specific antigen (PSA) test measures the amount of total PSA in your blood. A raised level of PSA can indicate changes or potential problems with the prostate gland.

The MyHealthTest PSA test report contains:

  • Your test result for PSA
  • An indication if it is outside the expected range
  • Links to key information to help you understand your result

Here is an example report

There are some activities that can temporarily increase your PSA level. It is important to know what things to avoid before a PSA test so that your results will be as accurate as possible and do not cause you to stress over high numbers due to temporary changes.

Strenuous exercise: your PSA level can temporarily rise due to strenuous exercise such as cycling or sexual activity for up to 48 hours before taking the test.

Medical considerations: it’s recommended you wait six to eight weeks before taking the test if you’ve had a biopsy, exam or surgery of the prostate, urinary tract infection (UTI), or a pelvic injury.

Medications: various medications can affect your PSA levels and your doctor will take this into consideration when interpreting the results. For more information these are outlined in the Clinical Information section.

Incorrect sample collection: it's important to follow the provided sample collection guidelines carefully, so we can ensure the accuracy of your test result. Incorrect collection of your blood is likely to affect your test result.

FRONT OF CARD

BACK OF CARD

Different laboratories: blood test results from different laboratories can and do vary - this is because different laboratories may use different methods of testing. This should be considered if you’re comparing your MyHealthTest results to those from other labs, for more information please read our Frequently Asked Questions tab.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about PSA tests or using this test service.

The PSA test is used to detect changes in a man’s prostate gland. It is not suitable for everyone.

PSA tests should not be used for:

  • Women or children
  • Men under 40 years who have no family history of prostate cancer
  • Men 70 years or older (unless recommended by your doctor)
  • Men who have already undergone treatment on their prostate such as surgery, radiation or chemotherapy.

Men should always make an individual informed decision about PSA testing based on the latest available evidence on the benefits and potential harms of testing.

Always consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about PSA testing or using this test service.

The decision to check PSA levels is entirely personal and should be done in consultation with your doctor. If you have decided that testing is right for you, there's a really easy way to track your PSA levels over time using our subscription service.

You can track your PSA levels over time, because each time you take the test, your results will be recorded and shown in tables and a graph, a little bit like viewing your phone or electricity bill. You will be able to see at a glance how your PSA levels are changing over time, making it easier for you to monitor and manage your health. You can set up to automatically share your results with your doctor or others as you choose, or you can easily print out your results to take to your health care provider if you prefer.

The Consensus Guidelines developed in 2016 by the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia provide recommendations on the use of PSA testing for the early detection of prostate cancer. This includes men aged between 50-69 testing regularly and men as young as 40 with a family history of prostate cancer (or a mother/sister with breast cancer) getting checked at least once prior to 50.

Perhaps you are on an active surveillance program and need to check your levels every 3 or 6 months? Or maybe you'd like to make sure you remember to do your screening test regularly, as you’ve agreed with your GP. Our subscription service makes it easy – simply tell us how often you want to take your test and we'll take care of the rest. We'll send you your new collection kit when it's time to do your next check, and it's affordable too – you only pay for each test service when it's time to send you a new kit.

Early detection could be your key to avoiding aggressive treatments with serious side effects.

If you subscribe to regular tests, you'll save more than 15% OFF the single test service price. A minimum purchase of two test services is required to take advantage of the subscription savings. Conditions apply, please read our frequently asked questions and Terms and Conditions.

Facts:
  • About 1 in 7 Australian men over the age of 40 will suffer from problems with their prostate - see Prostate conditions
  • Most of the time, a raised PSA blood test is not due to cancer
  • More Australian men die of prostate cancer each year than women do of breast cancer
  • It’s estimated, more than 17,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2018

The prostate gland is a male reproductive organ, which sits underneath the bladder and surrounds the top part of the urethra; it starts out about the size of a walnut and grows as you get older. The prostate secretes the fluid that nourishes the sperm.

Source: www.cancer.org.au

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is a protein made in the prostate gland. PSA is present in the blood in low levels and the level increases with age as the prostate enlarges.

As a man ages, the level of PSA in the blood increases. It’s not uncommon for men to experience prostate or urinary problems as they age (from about the age of 50).

There are 3 common medical conditions of the prostate:

Prostatitis: inflammation of the prostate gland, usually caused by a bacterial infection or non-bacterial inflammation. For more info

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): it’s the most common prostate condition – a non-cancerous growth or enlargement of the prostate, usually occurring in men over 40. For more info

Prostate cancer: where cells in the prostate grow and divide abnormally, forming one or more tumours. Only about 1 in 3 cases of raised PSA is cancer. It’s more common in men over 50. For more info

Some men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer may decide against immediate treatment (due to the side effects of surgery and radiotherapy) and commence what is called active surveillance.

In consultation with your doctor, a PSA test every three to six months (along with physical examination and possibly biopsies) can be used to monitor your condition.

For more information on active surveillance for prostate cancer speak to your doctor and visit Cancer Council or the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia.

What people are saying about MyHealthTest

“My father was diagnosed with prostate cancer and then it spread to his bones and he was gone within a year, he left it too late to go to the doctor. I knew that having a family history meant that I should get checked, but it’s embarrassing to talk about it and I don’t like going to doctors. I was at first worried about doing the online test and waiting for my results, but it was easy, it came in the post and I did it just before going to work and didn’t have to take time off work. I was relieved to get my results and will be checking it regularly now.”

David, NSW

The MyHealthTest Prostate (PSA) test is a simple, at-home fingerprick test that measures the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in your blood.

PSA is a protein made in the prostate gland. A PSA blood test can identify changes or problems in the prostate. It’s also used as a first-line test for prostate cancer. However, PSA is not specific to cancer – a higher PSA result can also indicate other common prostate issues, like an enlarged prostate or an infection.

If your PSA level is raised, your doctor will investigate this further and discuss the options available to best manage your health based on your particular circumstances.

Yes, but our PSA test is not a replacement for a consultation with a healthcare professional.

We recommend you talk to your doctor about your specific concerns before you take a PSA test, so you understand the information you will receive.

Once you’ve discussed PSA testing with your doctor and decide if it’s right for you, you can order MyHealthTest’s PSA test service online, which offers a simple and convenient testing alternative to visiting a local pathology centre.

Once you receive your results, if your PSA level is elevated – or you’re concerned about some other aspect of your test result – we recommend discussing any concerns with a healthcare professional.

Many people like to pro-actively monitor their health and then discuss their results with their healthcare provider. Additionally, some people don’t visit their GP regularly, or live in rural/remote areas, and this test service gives them the opportunity to monitor their own health.

If you’ve discussed PSA testing with your doctor and decide it’s right for you, our fingerprick blood test service is an easy and convenient alternative to visiting and having blood taken at a pathology centre.

You can order your sample collection kit online, which is mailed out to you. To take a fingerprick blood test, we only need a few spots of blood placed onto a special collection card that you post back to our Australian pathology lab.

We send the results directly to you via our secure website and you can share and discuss these results with your doctor if you choose.

MyHealthTest’s fingerprick blood testing service is reliable and accurate.

Research studies have shown PSA levels can be reliably measured from dried blood spots. Our dried blood spot sampling method has also been validated and is comparable to testing with traditional whole blood samples (e.g. having blood taken at a local pathology centre).

Find out more about dried blood spot testing and our state-of-the-art Australian pathology lab.

Your PSA level can temporarily rise due to activities such as, vigorous exercise, bike riding and recent sexual activity, as well as if you’ve had a urinary tract infection (UTI) or prostate examination. Even some medications may affect your PSA levels. We recommend you read the PSA Testing section and more technical details for clinicians outlined in the Clinical Information section.

Our PSA test service is not suitable for monitoring prostate problems after prostate surgery, radiation or chemotherapy.

A PSA blood test can identify changes or problems in the prostate gland. It’s also used as a first-line test for prostate cancer.

However, PSA is not specific to cancer – a higher PSA result can also indicate other prostate issues, like an enlarged prostate or an infection.

In some cases an individual with prostate cancer will not have a high PSA test result.

PSA levels also increase with age. This means an expected level for a healthy 75-year-old may be higher than the expected level for a 55-year-old.

If you record a higher PSA than the expected level for your age group (provided with your test results), please consult your doctor.

We recommend you read the PSA Testing section on this page.

Our PSA test service is currently available online from our webstore.

You may purchase this service for your own use or for an individual you care for i.e., another adult you are the authorised carer for.

Pathology results from different laboratories can and do vary. This should be considered if comparing to results from other labs.

MyHealthTest uses dried blood spot samples using laboratory techniques which differ from traditional whole blood testing. The MyHealthTest test results have been validated and compared to traditional testing to ensure that you are given an accurate and reliable result. For more information click here to see a video https://www.patientpower.info.

If your PSA test result is above the expected range for your age group this will be indicated on your report as *HIGH.

An example report can be found here

There is no critical level for PSA that requires urgent medical attention. If you have a level above the expected level it is recommended you take this to your doctor within the next few weeks. Your doctor will work with you on the next steps on how to best manage your health.

If you have further questions, please view our general frequently asked questions

The following information is intended for clinicians, and consumers who want more details about this test.

MyHealthTest’s fingerprick blood test for total prostate specific antigen (PSA) was developed to increase accessibility of getting a blood test conveniently.

The test will be of use to men who, after consultation with their healthcare provider, have decided that they wish to monitor their PSA level but due to access issues (geographic, physical or time constraints) are finding it difficult to present for blood tests as planned.

The test may also be used to improve the accessibility and convenience of blood testing in an active surveillance program under medical supervision.

The MyHealthTest PSA test is a screening tool to identify individuals who may have a problem with their prostate. This test is not suitable for monitoring for recurrence of prostate problems after treatment via prostatectomy, radiation or chemotherapy. Test performance has not been studied on samples above 34µg/L. Consequently, we do not recommend use of this methodology for testing patients with established, advanced prostate cancer where a higher result might be of interest (e.g. monitoring metastatic disease)

It does not include additional tests sometimes used to further categorise the risk of prostate cancer. These tests may be recommended by a doctor after an initial PSA test and consultation.

  • Free PSA test – measures the PSA molecules in the blood that are not attached to other blood proteins (free PSA). This test may be performed if a PSA level is high. A low level of free PSA may indicate prostate cancer.
  • Prostate Health Index (PHI) – a blood test that measures three different forms of the PSA protein. This test is not widely used in Australia.
  • Age related median PSA – if an individual’s PSA concentration is above the median level for his age, his probability of prostate cancer is above average.

MyHealthTest do not offer these additional tests, we recommend speaking with a doctor to discuss if further testing is required.

Dried blood spot results obtained for PSA are comparable to serum samples collected by venepuncture and analysed by the same method (DELFIA time resolved fluorescence immunoassay); and has clinically acceptable precision to be used as a tool for both screening and in active surveillance for prostate conditions.

Figure 1. Total PSA Bland Altman and Linear Regression analysis of serum vs DBS

Assay type: DELFIA time resolved fluorescence (Perkin Elmer)
Instrument: Victor2D (Perkin Elmer)
Sample:Fingerprick dried blood spot (DBS)
Measurand:Total PSA concentration in whole blood
Measurement Range:0.5 – 250 µg/L
Limit of Quantitation:0.5 µg/L
Clinical target concentration:
PSA DBS reference interval (<50 yrs.): <2.2 µg/L
PSA DBS reference interval (50 – 60 yrs.): <3.9 µg/L
PSA DBS reference interval (>60 yrs.): <6.9 µg/L
Repeatability (within-run precision):0.38 µg/L at 3 µg/L; 6.3% at 22 µg/L
Reproducibility (intermediate precision)*:11% at 3 µg/L; 8.5% at 22 µg/L
Stability:12 days
Interferences:
  • Human glandular kallikrein (HK2) cross reacts with total PSA and may falsely increase the reported value
  • Heterophilic antibodies in the patient sample may occasionally interfere with the assay, falsely elevating the reported value
  • High or low haematocrit outside the expected range of 39 – 53% may affect the reported total PSA value due to the nature of dried blood spots
Thermal stability:46°C for 2 days

*Further information on measurement uncertainty is available upon request.

Samples are stable for up to 12 days after collection and thermal stability testing confirmed that after holding dried blood spot samples at 46°C for two days there was no significant difference in the PSA values obtained.

When evaluating PSA test results there are several factors that need to be taken into consideration by doctors.

Various medications can artificially and temporarily affect PSA levels. These include:

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen can lower PSA
  • Cholesterol-lowering medications (statins) can lower PSA levels
  • Diuretics (used to treat high blood pressure, oedema)
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Supplements: used by body builders that can cause testosterone to rise.

Other factors that do not physically change PSA levels but may interfere with the test results, and are included in the table above.

An example test report can be viewed here